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Fruit Juice for Fruit Servings

Glass of fruit juice for fruit servings

Health professionals continue to say that we should eat more servings of fruits and vegetables as this is extremely important for our good health. Drinking 100 percent fruit juice is an easy way to boost your fruit intake.

Fruit juices are a valuable source of unique compounds found only in plants. Including 100 percent juices in your eating plan will help provide a wide variety of these healthful plant compounds.

The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee Report states that, with the exception of fiber, fruit juices provide substantial contributions of several vitamins and minerals. Juices, as well as other beverages, contribute to daily fluid intake.

100 Percent Fruit Juice DOES Count As a Fruit Serving

Fresh Fruit Juices One hundred percent juice can count as a fruit serving.

Any fruit or 100 percent fruit juice counts as part of the fruit group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut up, or pureed.

To determine if a product is 100 percent juice, the container label must state that the product is 100 percent juice. This information is usually included near the Nutrition Facts panel on the back of the label.

One half cup of 100 percent fruit juice equals 1/2 cup from the fruit group. While most fruit servings should come from whole fruits, a portion of the daily fruit intake can be from 100 percent fruit juice.

Quick Facts About 100 Percent Fruit Juice

  • There are no added sugars in 100 percent fruit juice - just natural sugars found in whole fruit.
  • 100 percent juices are naturally nutritious
  • Most 100 percent fruit juices have only 60 to 80 calories per 4 ounce portion
  • The role 100 percent fruit juice can play is an important part of the daily fruit allowance
  • 100 percent juice is considered a "nutrient dense" beverage - per calorie, it packs more nutritional value than other beverage choices.

Did you know?

Frozen juice concentrate can be quickly liquified by whirling it in a blender for a few seconds. Add the required water and process until juice is frothy.

Fruit Juice and Children

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is an ongoing food consumption research program that monitors food intake. This research helps health professionals track eating patterns over many years.

NHANES data show that consumption of 100 percent fruit juices by children and teenagers is within acceptable guidelines set by the American Academy of Pediatrics. A recent NHANES analysis also shows that children who consume 100 percent juices have overall healthier diets than those who do not consume juices.

According to the latest consumption data collected by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the majority of America's children and teens are drinking 100 percent fruit juices in amounts recommended by health professionals.

100 Percent Fruit Juice Guidelines for Children

Notable Notes on Apple Juice

  • Apple juice is not high on the nutrient scale. It contains no vitamin C unless it has been added.
  • Most of an apple harvest ends up being made into pasteurized apple products or frozen in order to preserve it. When pasteurized at temperatures of 170 degrees to 190 degrees, microorganisms are destroyed and the juice has a stable shelf life of up to one year.
  • Apple juice and cider should not be purchased unless you are sure that the whole apple was not used in their preparation. The pits contain a poison.
  • Nutritionally there is no difference between "natural" and "regular" apple juice, even the fiber content is the same.
  • If you purchase frozen apple concentrate, it will only last for a few weeks after it is thawed.

Summary

Research shows that drinking 100 percent fruit juice is associated with a more nutritious diet overall. Studies suggest that appropriate consumption of 100 percent fruit juice is linked to an overall healthier eating pattern, including reduced intake of total dietary fat, saturated fat and added sugars.

Resources: American Dietetic Association, Juice Products Association

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