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Patchouli as an Herb

Patchouli as an herb

Pogostemon cablin, P. patchouli

Other Names: Putcha-Pat, Patchouly

The ovate leaves of patchouli have a strong characteristic odor when rubbed. The extracted oil is used in perfumery. The desired characteristics improve with age.

Patchouli is used to treat dysentery, diarrhea, colds without fevers, vomiting, and nausea.

Its use is said to cause sometimes loss of appetite and sleep and nervous attacks. The Chinese, Japanese and Arabs believe it to possess prophylactic properties.

Patchouli as an Herb for Medicinal Uses

Medicinal parts of patchouli are the young leaves and shoots and the oil extracted from them.

Patchouli essential oil is used in aromatherapy to calm the nerves, and as an aphrodisiac. Too much of it can act as a sedative. Beyond that, there is no known medicinal use.

Patchouli is used in coarser perfumes and in 'White Rose' and 'Oriental' toilet soaps. Although the odor is objectionable to some, it is widely-used both in Asia and India. Sachets are made of the coarsely-powdered leaves.

Cosmetically Patchouli is used to rejuvenate mature skin and as a deodorant to mask body odors.

In Folk medicine, it was said to be of great service in epilepsy. Its narcotic properties cause it to be used in diarrhea and dysentery, neuralgia, and dysmenorrhoea.

Suggestion: Try growing this fragrant plant as a houseplant.

Patchouli: A Love Potion?

Patchouli is associated with both love and money and is often used to attract a rich mate. You can make your own richness enhancing perfume oil by adding 10 to 15 drops of patchouli oil, some cinnamon oil and vetiver to a 15 milliliter bottle, then filling the bottle with a scentless blending oil such as grapeseed or apricot kernel oil. Don't apply essential oils directly to your skin, as some of them are quite strong and can burn.

To make a light perfume spray, let handfuls of the dried herb steep in vodka for several weeks, then strain the alcohol off the herb. This scented alcohol, called a patchouli tincture, can be diluted with water to make a cologne spray and blended with other tinctures to create your own personalized scent.

Cautions

Patchouli is believed to be safe.

Wild gathering: Avoid wild gathering. Some plants are endangered species. Please grow your own herbs in your own window boxes.

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