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Raspberry as an Herb

Raspberry as an herb

Rubus idaeus

Other Names: Red Raspberry

The well known Raspberry is grown largely for its fruit, which contains folic acid, iron salts, copper salts, vitamins A and C.

Raspberry as an Herb for Medicinal Uses

The medicinal parts are the leaves and the fruit.

Raspberry syrup dissolves the tartar of the teeth.

Raspberry leaf tea, made by the infusion of 1 ounce of the dried leaves in a pint of boiling water, is used as a gargle for sore mouths, canker of the throat, and as a wash for wounds and ulcers.

An infusion of Raspberry leaves, taken cold, is a reliable remedy for extreme laxity of the bowels. The infusion alone, or as a component part of injections, never fails to give immediate relief. It is also useful for vomiting in small children, and dysentery and diarrhea and like stomach complaints in infants and children.

Red Raspberry is one of the most proven female herbs. It strengthens the uterine wall during pregnancy, reduces the pain of childbirth, and helps to reduce false labor pains. After childbirth it is used to decrease uterine swelling and cut down on post-partum bleeding. It is used to ease menstrual cramps and to regulate the flow during menstruation.

Warm raspberry tea soothes sore throats, mouth ulcers and bleeding gums, and is applied to canker sores. It also strengthens and nourishes the male reproductive organs.

Raspberry Ketones for Weight Loss

Raspberry Ketone became a popular weight loss topic. As with any product, there are views coming from both sides of the fence, but excitement mounted with Dr. Oz featured it on his show saying, "It is a Miracle Fat Burner!".

Now, people around the world are discovering just how effective raspberry ketone is with some reports of weight loss success within a few days of use.

Wild Red Raspberries

Wild red raspberry has several reported qualities that make it quite different from its European cousin. Wild red raspberry leaves are sometimes suggested for the relief of nausea, indigestion and bowel irregularity.

Culinary Uses of Raspberry

Raspberry vinegar is an acid syrup made with the fruit-juice, sugar and white-wine vinegar, and when added to water forms an excellent cooling drink in summer, also found helpful in cases of fever.

Leaf tea and berries used as beverages. Berries used fresh at the table, made into jams, jellies, shrubs, syrups, and baked in desserts.

Raspberry Syrup: Cook 7 parts fresh juice with 10 parts sugar until desired consistency is obtained.

Czechoslavakian 'Shrub' (Syrup 2): 5 to 10 quarts of berries, mashed and put into a crock; cover with netting and let set 3 days until it begins to ferment; after 3 days, skim pulp off surface and strain juice; measure juice and add an equal amount of sugar to it; bring mixture to a boil and hold boil for 1 minute; let cool; bottle.

Raspberry Water: 1 pound raspberries, 5 ounces sugar and 1 quart of water; warm the water and pour over berries and sugar; when sugar is melted, strain; cool and drink.

Raspberry Drinks:
1)  Measure 2 tablespoons of 'Shrub' to a glass of gingerale, soda water or drinking water.
2)  2 quarts of raspberries; express the juice; for each cup of juice add 1/2 cup sugar; boil gently for 5 minutes; place in jar and use 1 to 2 tablespoons in a glass of water.

Raspberry Wine Recipe

Bottle of raspberry wine

Not enough raspberries? No worries! The wine will be fine made in the pan and added as the fruit ripens, and can be gathered in dry weather.

Ingredients and Instructions: To every 3 pints of fruit, carefully cleared of moldy or bad spots, put 1 quart of water; bruise the former. To every 3 pints of fruit, carefully cleared of moldy or bad spots, put 1 quart of water; bruise the former. If for white currants, use lump sugar. It is best to put the fruit, etc., into a large pan, and when, in three or four days, the scum rises, skim that off before the liquor is added into the barrel. Note: Those who make from their own gardens may not have a sufficiency to fill the barrel at once. The wine will be fine made in the pan and added as the fruit ripens, and can be gathered in dry weather.

Raspberry Brandy Recipe

Raspberries make a wonderful flavoring for brandy. Make this recipe as strong or weak as you prefer with the brandy. This is a very old recipe, from days when precise quantities were not noted.

Raspberry Brandy Ingredients and Instructions: Pick fine dry raspberries; place them into a stone jar. Put the jar into a kettle of water, or on a hot hearth, until the juice starts to run; strain. For every pint add 1/2 pound of sugar, bring to a boil and skim it. When cold, put equal quantities of juice and brandy, shake well and bottle. Some people prefer it "stronger of the brandy" than this recipe states. Simply add brandy to suit your preference.

Raspberry Candy Recipe

Have you ever tried raspberry candy? Nummy!

2 tablespoons butter (plus a bit more to grease the pan)
2 cups sugar
1/2 cups raspberry vinegar

Grease a large pan or cookie sheet; melt the butter in a saucepan, then add the sugar and vinegar. Stir over medium heat until the the sugar is dissolved. Turn heat up a bit and boil gently while stirring frequently untl the mixture reaches 300 degrees on a candy thermometer. Pour onto pan or cookie sheet. While still soft score the candy into bite size pieces. When completely set up and hard, break along the scoring marks.

Super Summer Treats

Raspberry Pavlova Milkshake: Blend 1 cup each raspberry sorbet and vanilla frozen yogurt, 1/4 cup milk and 1/2 cup raspberries; pour into glasses. Beat 2 egg whites and 2 tablespoons superfine sugar until stiff. Spoon onto the shake glasses and brown with a kitchen torch.

Cautions

No health hazards or side effects are known in conjunction with the proper administration of designated therapeutic dosages.

Black Raspberry Milkshake: Blend 1 pint black raspberry ice cream, 1/4 cup each raspberries and seltzer, and 1 teaspoon lemon juice. Top with whipped cream.

Notable Note: Too much raspberry may cause nausea and mild loosening of stools.

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