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Salmon The Perfect Grilling Fish

Salmon The Perfect Grilling Fish

Salmon is the perfect grilling fish. It maintains its texture while grilling and is delicious with a variety of herbs and spices.

Salmon is in abundant supply in fresh, frozen and canned varieties. This is making salmon a hearty and easy to prepare dish on many family menus. Whether netted off the coast of Alaska or raised in a sheltered cove in northern Maine, salmon will be at its finest on your table if you take care in buying, storing and cooking it.

Salmon Cooking Tips

The following tips are from the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute.

  • Look for solidly frozen packages stored below the chill line in the freezer case of your grocery store.
  • Do not buy salmon with freezer burns or icy white discoloration.
  • Until you are ready to use it, keep salmon firmly frozen, wrapped in moisture-proof paper or in an airtight container. For best quality, store at 0-degrees or lower for up to four months.
  • To thaw, place the wrapped package in the refrigerator overnight on a plate or a shallow pan to catch the drips. Allow eight to ten hours to thaw completely.
  • You need not remove the soft edible bones in canned salmon. They are a rich source of calcium for folks of all ages, including children who have dairy product allergies.
  • Red sockeye is the premier canned salmon. Deep red with a firm texture, it is a great choice for salads or entrees where color is key to a pretty presentation.
  • Milder, softer-textured pink salmon is perfect for pasta, soups, sandwiches and casseroles. Most abundant, pink salmon is less costly than red.
  • Peeling skin from salmon: Bring 1/2-inch of water to a slow boil in a frying pan. Place the salmon, skin side down, in the water for a minute. Carefully remove the salmon from the water and the skin peels right off. Gently rinse the fish and proceed with your recipe.

DO Eat Salmon -- But NOT This Kind!

Fresh salmon is high in Omega 3s, but smoking salmon reduces the amount by about 75 percent. In fact, eating pickled or smoked foods several times a week has been linked to an increased risk of developing certain cancers. Recommendation: While an occasional smoked or pickled snack shouldn't harm your health, it's best not to eat them regularly.

Fishing for a Bargain

Salmon While eating salmon is the best way to get your omega-3 fatty acids, it can be pricey, especially wild varieties (8-dollars a pound and up, depending on season and where you live). Farmed fish is often less expensive but may contain environmental contaminants like PCBs. Most salmon used for canning is the safer wild type and canned salmon isn't horribly expensive, either.

Warning: Don't Eat Farmed Fish

In 2007, according to the environmental group Oceana Chile who obtained the statistics from the Chilean government, Chile, then the largest supplier of farmed salmon to the U.S., used more than 385,000 kilograms of antibiotics in its salmon farms. At least four of those antibiotics are not included on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Approved Drugs list. Suggestion is to stay away from farmed fish. Instead, buy the wild Alaskan salmon currently in season. It is sustainably fished and tastes so much better than the farmed. Or simply stick with wild fish.

Following are a few recipes to get you started.

Grilled Alaska Salmon

Salmon on a cutting board with bread and oil 8 (4 ounce) filets salmon
1/2 cup peanut oil
4 tablespoons soy sauce
4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
4 tablespoons green-onions, chopped
3 teaspoons brown sugar
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
2 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon salt

Place salmon filets in a medium, nonporous glass dish. In a separate medium bowl, combine the peanut oil, soy sauce, vinegar, green onions, brown sugar, garlic, ginger, red pepper flakes, sesame oil and salt. Whisk together well, and pour over the fish. Cover and marinate the fish in the refrigerator for four to six hours.

Prepare an outdoor grill with coals about 5-inches from the grate, and lightly oil the grate. Grill the fillets 5-inches from coals for ten minutes per inch of thickness (measure at the thickest part) or until fish just flakes with a fork. Turn over halfway through cooking.

Firecracker Grilled Alaska Salmon Recipe

8 (4 ounce) fillets salmon
1/2 cup peanut oil
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
1/4 cup green onions, chopped
1 tablespoon brown sugar
2 cloves garlic, minced
1-1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
2 teaspoons crushed red
Pepper flakes
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon salt

Place salmon filets in a medium, nonporous glass dish. In a separate medium bowl, combine the peanut oil, soy sauce, vinegar, green onions, brown sugar, garlic, ginger, red pepper flakes, sesame oil and salt. Whisk together well, and pour over the fish. Cover and marinate the fish in the refrigerator for four to six hours.

Prepare an outdoor grill with coals about 5-inches from the grate, and lightly oil the grate. Grill the fillets 5-inches from coals for ten minutes per inch of thickness, measured at the thickest part, or until fish just flakes with a fork. Turn over halfway through cooking.

Salmon Arrosoto with Rosemary Recipe

Pungent rosemary, used rarely with fish, complements salmon's rich flavor.

Fresh rosemary 2 large bunches fresh rosemary
1 large red onion, thinly sliced
2-pound salmon fillet cut from center of fish, skin on

Preheat oven to 500-degrees. Wash the rosemary, and pat it dry. Place one bunch on a shallow baking sheet. Sprinkle the onion on top of the rosemary.

With tweezers, remove any bones from the salmon. Season the salmon with kosher salt or regular salt, and ground black pepper. Place on the onion, skin side down. Cover the salmon with the remaining bunch of rosemary, saving a few sprigs for garnish. Roast for 20 minutes. The fish will be moist. Do not over cook.

Remove the salmon from the oven. Transfer to a platter with the cooked onion. Serve with sprigs of fresh rosemary. Yield: 6 servings

Salmon Pot Pies Recipe

Salmon Pot Pies 1 can (6 ounces) skinless boneless pink salmon, well drained
1 cup water
1 teaspoon or 1 cube chicken-flavored bouillon
1 cup frozen vegetables
1 cup milk
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/2 to 1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1 can of (8 ounces) refrigerated crescent roll dough

In a medium saucepan, combine water, vegetables and bouillon. Bring to a boil; cook for two minutes over medium heat. Dissolve cornstarch in milk; stir into vegetables and cook until thickened. Stir in salmon and cheese. Spoon mixture into four (one to 1-1/2-cup) individual pie pans or casserole dishes.

Separate crescent dough into four rectangles; cut each rectangle into six strips. Firmly press topping, crisscrossing six dough strips over each potpie; trim excess dough. Bake pies at 375-degrees for 15 to 20 minutes. Yield: 4 servings

Simple Salmon Sandwich

Mix 3 ounces canned boneless, skinless wild salmon, drained, with 1/4 cup chopped red bell pepper and 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil. Top with romaine lettuce leaves and serve on whole wheat roll. Total calories are 413.

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